Quick Answer: Which Countries Have The Strictest Internet Censorship?

Is YouTube banned in Saudi Arabia?

YouTube is not blocked in the country.

However, in 2014, Saudi Arabia made plans to regulate local companies producing content for YouTube.

The General Authority for Audiovisual Media, a recently formed watchdog, issued a public declaration to regulate the work of YouTube channels..

Is Netflix banned in Saudi Arabia?

Article 6 of the Saudi anti-cyber crime law, which was cited by the Saudi commission in its request to Netflix, prohibits the “production, preparation, transmission or storage of material impinging on public order, religious values, public morals and privacy” on the internet.

US Censorship. The First Amendment to the United States Constitution protects the freedom of speech and expression against all levels of government censorship. … Direct censorship of the internet is prohibited by the First Amendment with the exception of obscenity such as child pornography.

How many countries censor the Internet?

OpenNet Initiative reports. Through 2010 the OpenNet Initiative had documented Internet filtering by governments in over forty countries worldwide. The level of filtering in 26 countries in 2007 and in 25 countries in 2009 was classified in the political, social, and security areas.

Why is Google banned in China?

In March 2009, China blocked access to Google’s YouTube site due to footage showing Chinese security forces beating Tibetans; access to other Google online services was being denied to users arbitrarily.

Does Japan censor the Internet?

There are few obstacles to access in Japan, and the internet penetration rate is over 90 percent. Japan’s constitution protects all forms of speech and prohibits censorship, although some legislation disproportionately penalizes specific online activities.

Does the US government block any websites?

According to the report, the US government claimed that eNom was “legally required” to block the websites under US law, even though the websites were not hosted in the US, were not targeted at US persons and were legal under foreign law.

How many countries are in the world?

195 countriesThere are 195 countries in the world today. This total comprises 193 countries that are member states of the United Nations and 2 countries that are non-member observer states: the Holy See and the State of Palestine.

Which countries have censorship?

More information links:CountryRegionRWB Press freedom indexCentral African RepublicAfrica26.61ChadAfrica34.87ChileSAmerica26.24ChinaAsia73.0735 more rows

What countries have no Internet censorship?

Syria, China, Cuba, Ethiopia and Uzbekistan follow Iran in terms of Internet freedom. In contrast, Iceland ranked first as the nation with the most Internet freedom. The government there doesn’t blog social media platforms or content and 97 percent of households are connected to the Internet.

What websites are blocked in Japan?

by Shusuke Murai The report named three major piracy websites — Mangamura, Anitube and Miomio — as targets of the blocking measure. Online, speculation has been rife that Mangamura, one of the most notorious manga piracy websites, has been shut down, as it has been inaccessible since around Tuesday.

In which countries Internet is banned?

RWB Enemies of the Internet and Countries under Surveillance listsBahrain: 2012–present.Belarus: 2006–2008, 2012–present.China: 2008–present.Cuba: 2006–present.Ethiopia: 2014–present.India: 2014–present.Iran: 2006–present.North Korea: 2006–present.More items…

What is censored in America?

Censorship in the United States involves the suppression of speech or public communication and raises issues of freedom of speech, which is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. Interpretation of this fundamental freedom has varied since its enshrinement.

Why is censorship important?

General censorship occurs in a variety of different media, including speech, books, music, films, and other arts, the press, radio, television, and the Internet for a variety of claimed reasons including national security, to control obscenity, child pornography, and hate speech, to protect children or other vulnerable …

What countries have the most Internet censorship?

Top 10 Internet-censored countriesCuba. … Saudi Arabia. … Iran. … China. … Syria. … Tunisia. … Vietnam. The Communist Party requires Yahoo, Google and Microsoft to divulge data on all bloggers who use their platforms. … Turkmenistan. The only Internet service provider is the government.More items…•

Which country has the most Internet freedom?

IcelandThe world’s best country for internet freedom, Iceland, “boasts enviable conditions, including near-universal connectivity, limited restrictions on content, and strong protections for users’ rights,” write Freedom House authors Adrian Shahbaz and Allie Funk.

Why do countries censor the Internet?

While most democratic countries have moderate Internet censorship, other countries go as far as to limit the access of information such as news and suppress discussion among citizens. Internet censorship also occurs in response to or in anticipation of events such as elections, protests, and riots.

What’s banned in Saudi Arabia?

Here’s what you need to know.No dabbing. … No wearing shorts. … Getting drunk on the flight over, or bringing in alcohol, could land you in serious trouble. … Don’t bring in a drone without approval. … Don’t cut in line. … You can’t bring any pork into the country. … Gambling is in principle illegal.More items…•

Is Internet censored in Saudi Arabia?

Censorship in Saudi Arabia. Multiple forms of media including books, newspapers, magazines, films, television, and content published on the Internet are censored in Saudi Arabia. The Saudi government closely monitors media and restricts it under official state law.

Does the US government censor the Internet?

Federal laws. With a few exceptions, the free speech provisions of the First Amendment bar federal, state, and local governments from directly censoring the Internet. The primary exception has to do with obscenity, including child pornography, which does not enjoy First Amendment protection.